Tag Archives: fun

Human knot

11 Apr

Purpose
fun, physical contact

Instruction
Ask the players to stand in a cirkle (or several cirkles – around 15 players seems to be a good standard) and close their eyes. Tell them to strech their arm out and walk slowly into the middle of the cirkle grasping the hands of two different people when able.

It can be a bit hard for everyone to find two hands and you may need to help a bit with physically moving hands around.

When everybody is holding hands with two different people you tell the players to open their eyes and tie up the knot by moving around without letting go of the hands.

Ending
The exercise ends when the players have “tied up” the knot, meaning that they are standing in a circle or the figure 8 holding hands. If it takes to long you can just stop them when it feels right – remember clapping.

Monkeys

10 Apr

Purpose
Fun, acting out

Instruction
tell all the player to lie down on the floor and close their eyes. Lead them through a story about lying on a grassy field, feeling the weight of their bodies against the ground and experiencing the sun and breeze. Allow them to relax for a moment.

Then tell them how their bodies feel as they wake up and start to move around, feeling their arms, legs and tail! Keep the storytelling going so you are controlling the development of the story. For each new part of the story you should escalate the turn of events.

Tell them that they are monkeys and they are waking up in their flock. Allow them to meet the other monkeys and to start short monkey conversations.

Divide the group into to flocks of monkeys meeting and battling eachother. Showing off and shouting at the potential danger. You can give them something to fight about by throwing a peace of fruit into the crowd.

Ending
End the story by telling them about the tiger arriving, playing out the tiger yourself and see all your monkeys scared of into a corner, cowering from the danger.

yay!

18 Feb

Purpose
fun, storytelling

Instruction
The purpose of the exercise is to tell a story together. Everybody begins in a tight group in the middle of the room. The facilitator then starts the exercise by setting a scene (ie. “we are in a forest”), and everybody throws their hands in the air and shouts yay!

The another participant takes over and tells the next part of the story (ie. “we are lost”). Everybody who agrees with this twist in the story throws their hands in the air and shouts yay! The ones who disagree leaves the group.

The exercise continues with new participants each telling a part of the story that the group can either agree with (and stay) or disagree with (and leave).

Ending

The exercise ends when there is only one (or a few) participants left.

Variation
The yay! exercise can be used to create common memories in the ingame player groups. In this case tell the players to define some central background stories for their group by using the yay! game – this way the background story will be defined as something everybody agrees upon and/or it will be a great tool for understanding where there is disagreement in the group.

friend/enemy

18 Feb

Purpose
fun, social dynamics

Instruction
The participants are told to stand in a circle and each secretly select a friend and an enemy. When the facilitator tells the participants to begin, everybody starts moving.

The purpose for the participants is to get as far away from their enemy as possible and to keep their friend in between themeselves and the enemy.

ending
Small groups will typically form during the exercise and the energizer ends when the facilitator feels that the energy is going down. Typically after a few minutes.

Variation
this exercise can also be used in the character creation proces, where the chosen friend/enemy can be used as ingame relations of a positive/negative orientation. The exercise can also be used after character creation for visualizing cliques in the ingame group.

Penguins and flamingos

18 Feb

Purpose
fun

Instruction
As everybody knows, penguin brain is what flamingos love to eat the most, which is why penguins always flee when a flamingo is within sight.

Penguins are only able to move with feet together and arms pressed to the sides of the body, wheras flamingos can only walk with long slow strides with one arm streched out and the hand shaped like a beak.

Every time a flamingo pecks a penguin in the head, thus eating its brain, the penguin turns into a flamingo.

Ending
The energizer ends when all penguins has been turned into flamingos.